Hayley is a Ghost

Arm chair skeptic

Posted on: March 30, 2011

I think that a lot of people in the paranormal research field don’t like me because of the way I research things, and that’s fine by me. It isn’t something I’m not aware of and yet I haven’t changed the way I work or operate, that alone should be very telling. I will probably also be told that I am imagining things are about me. Perhaps I am, but then, people moaning about “psuedo-skeptics” and armchair skeptics is something I get sent all the time, so I figure I fall into that category in some peoples minds.

I get the general impression that people think I’m some sort of fake skeptic, pretending to be a skeptical researcher so that I can draw attention to myself. I’m not, but I don’t have to justify myself to anyone as nobody holds an authority in paranormal research. I also don’t seek attention, however, if someone asks me to talk for them I will. I don’t see why I shouldn’t, it’s not as though I’m claiming to be an expert – I simply talk about my experiences as a paranormal researcher and I claim no authority.

A few people have commented on my article for BARsoc that shows me recreating a poltergeist video related to a recent news story, that it shouldn’t be dismissed simply because I can recreate the activity simply by using some thread. They’re right, and I haven’t claimed it should. Nor have I claimed that the notion that it was faked is a conclusion – it’s a theory.

I have contacted the reporter involved in the story to see if I can gain more information as I don’t have another way to contact the family in question personally.I also worry when people are offered exorcisms or “spirit clearings” by ex-TV mediums as I think such things can be quite damaging to peoples perception of potentially naturally occuring phenomena. I have also tried to establish contact because the case fascinated me and because I know full well that nothing should be concluded without knowing all the facts. It’s a shame that other people don’t do the same before complaining that “arm chair skeptics” not doing that very thing. Go figure.

In the BARsoc article I wrote:

“we set about seeing if we could recreate the activity the video that apparently convinced a housing association to move a family into a new home. Turns out we could. Quite easily. It was also slightly fun…”

There. That’s my claim, that we could recreate the activity seen in the video provided. I went on to conclude:

“in summary, we find it rather confusing that the family would have such a dodgy video attached to their story if they had really, sincerely, honestly had the experiences they claim to. It smacks of being a case of people trying to move house and using the poltergeist idea to make it happen.”

Nothing there about it certainly being faked, I said it “smacks of” people wanting to move house and using a poltergeist to make it happen. I wouldn’t conclude that was certain though, unless I had information that supported it.

Until I get that information all I can do is theorise what might have caused the activity witnessed and reported, and put my theories to the test. One being that the video was faked (which I do believe it could have been). As I use skepticism to assess information, I am always willing to change my opinion or ideas to fit around new evidence that emerges.

If this makes me an armchair skeptic then so be it, however I think those throwing those accusations around should probably realise they know sod all about the research that I do. I write publically about a small portion of what goes on in private.

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2 Responses to "Arm chair skeptic"

If this is in regard to the house in Coventry (my hometown) I have to say, i’m inclined to agree with the ‘wanting to move’ scenario, (this wouldn’t be the first time I had read up on accounts of a similar nature to reach a similar goal. The most famous one of all? Amityville…)although I am more than happy to see more thorough evidence to prove otherwise. The video, which is a little vague at best, needs to be examined further, I feel. We don’t see the closet doors in their entirety, nor the legs of the chair. The door opens from left to right, and the chair also moves from left to right, suggesting that someone could be manipulating the items off screen to the right. Also, how did they know to record in the bedroom? was most recorded activity in there? I’m not trying to shoot it down, please believe me, but it leaves a lot of questions unanswered. Apparently Derek Acorah has since been in and ‘cleansed’ the place, which to me would be counter productive for them wanting to move I suppose, but would certainly give them 15 minutes of fame. Jury is still out on this for me, but i’m not totally convinced this is legit.

Keep up the good work!!

Given the evidence presented to date, I am sceptical that you are an armchair sceptic. However, I will be swayed by evidence countering that claim if it emerges 🙂

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Hayley is a ghost

Hayley Stevens is an advocate for science-based research into seemingly paranormal experiences and occurrences. With a background in the pseudo-scientific research into ghosts, Hayley offers a unique insight into the strange world of ghost hunting through her experience.

She describes herself as 'a ghost hunter who doesn't hunt for ghosts' and this is her personal blog where she writes about ghosts, people, and other interesting things. Read more here.

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